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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

5 edition of Decision making in the U.S. Courts of Appeals found in the catalog.

Decision making in the U.S. Courts of Appeals

Cross, Frank B.

Decision making in the U.S. Courts of Appeals

by Cross, Frank B.

  • 238 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Stanford University Press in Stanford, Calif .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • United States. -- Supreme Court.,
  • Judicial process -- United States.,
  • Appellate courts -- United States.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementFrank B. Cross.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsKF8990 .C76 2007
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17556993M
    ISBN 109780804753661, 9780804757133
    LC Control Number2006102587

    In this book, I discuss the confession cases in the U.S. Courts of Appeals, seeking to explain decision making in that area. In order to do so, I draw on principal-agent theory as it is related to the four major models of judicial decision making: the attitudinal model, the legal model, the strategic model, and the neo-institutional model. The U.S. Courts of Appeals were the first federal courts designed exclusively to hear cases on appeal from trial courts. Creating the appellate courts in was an effort to relieve the Supreme Court’s overwhelming caseload by dealing with the dramatic increase in federal appeals filings.

    Lindquist, S & Haire, SB , Decision making by an agent with multiple principals: Environmental policy in the U.S. courts of appeals. in Institutional Games and the U.S. Supreme Court. University of Virginia Press, pp. Author: Stefanie Lindquist, Susan B. Haire. Paper: “Does It Matter which Agent? Comparing the Influence of the Supreme Court on Decision Making in the U.S. Courts of Appeals with the State Courts of Last Resort” with Sara C. Benesh • Annual Meeting of Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, IL, April.

    Refers to court sessions with the entire membership of a court participating, rather than the usual quorum. U.S. courts of appeals usually sit in panels of three judges, but may expand to a larger number in certain cases they deem important enough to be decided by the entire court. They are then said to . Much of our law is made in the circuit courts of appeals; the influence that visiting judges have on the development of that law is not negligible. Should judges other than those appointed to the circuit be allowed to participate in the making of that law, and, if so, to what extent?


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Decision making in the U.S. Courts of Appeals by Cross, Frank B. Download PDF EPUB FB2

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This groundbreaking book analyzes the decisions made by the United States circuit courts over the past half century. These courts have a profound impact on the law―they issue many more decisions in many more areas of law than the Supreme prosportsfandom.com by: "Decision Making in the U.S.

Courts of Appeals is a fascinating, indeed seminal, piece of work full of often surprising insights. Any serious political scientist and interdisciplinary legal academic will have to read this book and confront its careful, meticulously designed arguments and evidence." —Sanford Levinson, University of Texas.

Decision making in the U.S. Courts of Appeals. [Frank B Cross] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for This book studies the decisions of the United States circuit courts and their grounding in law and judicial ideology.

Rating: (not yet rated). This book deals with the decisions rendered by the United States circuit courts of appeals and with the opinions from those decisions. These courts are intermediate, between the trial courts and the Supreme Court, and they resolve appeals from the legal rulings of the trial courts as well as from some administrative agencies.

In The View from the Bench and Chambers: Examining Judicial Process and Decision Making on the U. Courts of Appeals, Jennifer Barnes Bowie, Donald Songer, and John Szmer provide the strongest contribution to scholarship on the United States Courts of Appeals that has been offered to date.

Until President Jimmy Carter launched an effort to diversify the lower federal courts, the U.S. courts of appeals had been composed almost entirely of white males. But byover a quarter of sitting judges were women and 15 percent were African American or prosportsfandom.com by: 4. The NOOK Book (eBook) of the The View from the Bench and Chambers: Examining Judicial Process and Decision Making on the U.S.

Courts of Appeals by Jennifer. B&N Outlet Membership Educators Gift Cards Stores & Events Help Auto Suggestions are available once you type at least 3 letters.

This chapter describes the process of decision making, particularly the important process of arriving at the opinion of the court. In contrast to the extensive literature on the patterns of votes of judges on U.S. appellate courts, much less is known about the process of.

Apr 16,  · Acknowledged author Frank B. Cross wrote Decision Making in the U.S. Courts of Appeals comprising pages back in Textbook and eTextbook are published under ISBN and Since then Decision Making in the U.S.

Courts of Appeals textbook was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price or rent at the prosportsfandom.com Edition: 1. In Judging on a Collegial Court: Influences on Federal Appellate Decision Making, Virginia Hettinger, Stefanie Lindquist, and Wendy Martinek examine the dynamic that gives rise to such dissensus in federal appeals courts, revealing how the appellate process shapes the content and the consistency of the law.

My colleagues on the ELS Blog are hopelessly modest, so I cannot count on them to mention, much less tout, their academic accomplishments. Fortunately, based on my prior book orders, Amazon sent me an email informing me that I ought to buy Decision Making in the U.S.

Court of Appeals (Stanford ) by Frank Cross. According to Cass Sunstein, “This is one of the most important empirical. these lower courts serve as keepers of the rule of law in this country (Nardin ) and to more fully understand the nature of their decision making.

On the U.S. Courts of Appeals, a myriad of goals shape judicial choices (Klein ) so that "judges' deci sions are a function of what they prefer to do, tempered. group decision making on judicial product). Woodford Howard, Decision-Making Procedures in U.S.

Courts of Appeals for the 2d and 5th Circuits,Research Report Number 1, Federal Judicial Center (). Her first book, The Immigration Battle in American Courts (Cambridge University Press ), examined the role of the federal judiciary in U.S.

immigration policy, and the institutional evolution of the Supreme Court and U.S. Courts of Appeals. Law is a former program analyst at the bipartisan, blue-ribbon United States Commission on. Motion book. Tell a visual story. Create comics and graphic novels that jump off the screen. DA Muro.

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May 18, | 3 min read. Add to Favourites. Comment. Jan 30,  · Chinese courts are organized as a singular and unified system yet grassroots courts in urban and rural regions differ greatly in the way they use the law and are as diverse as the populations they serve.

Based on extensive fieldwork and in-depth interviews, this book offers a penetrating discussion of the operation of Chinese courts. Inside Appellate Courts is a comprehensive study of how the organization of a court affects the decisions of appellate judges.

Drawing on interviews with more than seventy federal appellate judges and law clerks, Jonathan M. Cohen challenges the assumption that increasing caseloads and bureaucratization have impinged on judges' abilities to bestow prosportsfandom.com by: / Decision making in the U.S. courts of appeals: The determinants of reversal on appeal.

New Directions in Judicial Politics. New Directions in Judicial Politics. Taylor and Francis, pp. Cited by: 1. Abstract. The publication in of Frank B. Cross's "Decision Making in the U.S. Courts of Appeals" is further evidence that the field of empirical inquiry within the Cited by: 9.

Diversity Matters is a substantial contribution both to judicial decision-making scholarship and to gender/race scholarship. The authors offer a rich theoretical framework, deploy a rigorous and well-suited analytic strategy, and provide an engaging discussion of what their evidence indicates with regard to the role of gender, race, and ethnicity in judging.

empirical legal study continues to expand, studies of the courts and judges remain the bellwether. The publication in of Professor Frank B. Cross’s Decision Making in the U.S. Courts of Appeals well evidences that the field of em-pirical inquiry within the legal academy has now reached a stage of.models of decision making that hold relevance for understanding policy making and processes in (lower) appellate courts.

In this section of the course, we will also take a “hands on” approach so that students will become familiar with data sources and measures used to study the U.S.

Courts of Appeals.Feb 06,  · The Florida Supreme Court last month rolled back a death penalty decision, causing chaos on death row and challenging a cornerstone of U.S. law. three U.S.